Zoe Crosher's "Sunlight as Spotlight" Opens @ Patrick Painter In Los Angeles

Zoe Crosher, enamored by Los Angeles, has an obsession that began during her time receiving her MFA from CalArts. Here, she has reimagined her “Day for Night” photographic works. In “Day for Night,” Crosher uses a photography technique used during the Film Noir days of Hollywood, by shooting images in such a way that they look like they were taken at night. She documents the disappearance of the Los Angeles River, using the sunlight to spotlight the image in frame. For this show, she has taken that process a step further and made light boxes out of the photographs, further emulating the film-like aspect by placing light behind the image, creating, in essence, a single-shot movie. Sunlight as Spotlight is on view through November 24 at Patrick Painter B2, 4031, 2525 Michigan Avenue, Santa Monica.

[ART] Pacific Standard Time

5_Wasser__Marcel_Duchamp_und_Eve_Babitz_beim_Schach
5_Wasser__Marcel_Duchamp_und_Eve_Babitz_beim_Schach

Post-war Los Angeles was like a subtropical greenhouse where art flourished – a movement emerged that would define the second half of twentieth century contemporary art in America – artists like Ed Ruscha and John Baldessari, and major events like Warhol's first exhibition, and Marcel Duchamp's first retrospective. But most of what we know about this time is only the very tip of the iceberg and the Getty Research Institute has been tirelessly diligent: "Through archival acquisitions, oral history interviews, public programming, exhibitions, and publications, the Research Institute is responding to the need to locate, collect, document, and preserve the art historical record of this vibrant period."  And as a result of these efforts one of the more monumental series of art exhibitions, collectively entitled Pacific Standard Time, will be on view this fall and winter at 60 venues across Southern California, including the Getty, the Hammer and LACMA.  The above photograph, by Julian Wasser, is of a nineteen year old Eve Babitz – considered a muse or a midwife to the Los Angeles art movement – nude and playing chess with Marcel Duchamp at his retrospective. She won.