Tracey Emin at White Cube in São Paulo

Tracey_Emin_White_Cube_São_Paulo
Tracey_Emin_White_Cube_São_Paulo

White Cube São Paulo presents its inaugural exhibition, You Don’t Believe in Love But I Believe in You by celebrated British artist Tracey Emin. A versatile modern-day expressionist, Emin’s intensely personal work blurs the boundaries between art and life. For this exhibition – her first in Brazil – she will present new works in a wide range of media including neons, sculptures, paintings, gouaches, monoprint drawings and embroideries. You Don’t Believe in Love But I Believe in You will be on view until February 23, 2013 at White Cube, Rua Agostinho Rodrigues Filho 550 Vila Mariana, São Paulo

PRIVACY Exhibition at Schirn Kunsthalle

PRIVACY_Exhibition_at_Shirn_Kunsthalle_Frankfurt_dash_snow
PRIVACY_Exhibition_at_Shirn_Kunsthalle_Frankfurt_dash_snow

Private—a word from the past, or so it would seem these days. A word of hardly any relevance in an era when everything—from one’s favorite recipe to one’s current relationship status—is posted on Facebook. Exhibitionism, self-disclosure, the delight in telling stories, showing off, and voyeurism are the social strategies in today’s world—a world that has long since undergone a structural transformation of the public sphere. In contemporary art, domestic scenes and personal secrets are mirrored in photographs, Polaroids, cell phone photos, objects, installations, and films. The familiar and intimate are put in the picture. Through a consideration of numerous contemporary approaches the Schirn investigates the dwindling private sphere and the “publicness of the intimate.” Aiming her camera through a rear courtyard window, Merry Alpern captures blurred scenes of hurried sexual encounters; in his romantic video piece Akram Zaatari explores an online chat between two men; and Fiona Tan combines private snapshots from different countries to create large tableaux. The exhibition undertakes memorable excursions to the fragile borders between the self and the other. Other artists include Dash Snow, Mark Morrisroe, Ai Weiwei and Marilyn Minter. Privacy will be on view from November 1, 2012, to February 3, 2013 at the Schirn Kunsthalle, Romberg, 60311 Frankfurt

She Lay Down Deep Beneath the Sea

she_lay_down_deep_beneath_the_sea_tracey_emin_turner_contemporary_2
she_lay_down_deep_beneath_the_sea_tracey_emin_turner_contemporary_2

Tracey Emin's first major solo exhibition at Turner Contemporary, entitled She Lay Down Deep Beneath the Sea, is conceived specially for Margate, where Emin grew up and which has provided inspiration for many of her most famous art works. The exhibition explores the themes of love, sensuality and romanticism in Emin's oeuvre, featuring both new and existing works including drawings, monoprints, sculptures and neons. The exhibition's central themes continue in a display of paintings, sketches and watercolours of erotic subjects by Tracey Emin as well as JMW Turner and Auguste Rodin, whose iconic sculpture The Kiss is on show at Turner Contemporary until 2 September 2012. Tracey Emin: She Lay Down Deep Beneath the Sea will be on view from May 26 to September 23 at the Turner Contemporary 

Tracey Emin: Love Is What You Want

Love Is What You Want
Love Is What You Want

"People like you should fuck people like me," reads one her famous neon sign installations.  "Good smile, Great come," reads another.  Tracey Emin, a celebrated contemporary English artist, who has a retrospective of sorts opening today in London, is labeled a "wild child" of the art world with no chance of taming.  Her neon scribbles are honest and personal, and speak of the post modern human condition on a profound level.  Emin has had her fair share of hard knocks–growing up poor, raped at 13, and an abortion of twins at 18–so now, with her trademark lopsided smile and sexy glint in her eyes, she's appropriately getting back at this fucked up mess we call a world–in a beautiful way.

Good Smile Great Come
Good Smile Great Come

Emin's rise to prominence culminated with a special exhibit at the Tate Gallery in 1999, in which she presented her unmade bed in the museum exactly as it was in her home–after spending countless suicidal days in it following a fight in relationship.  Yellowed sheets, cigarette butts, stained underwear, and condoms strewn about the bed was a shocking, visceral site to behold–a strange reminder of the fragile, intricacies of the human psyche.  A famous photograph, a self-portrait of the artist herself, from a gallery show I've Got it All Now (2000) - displays Emin clutching bank notes and coins into her crotch - an analytical critique for man's unquenchable desire for money.

"Oh Christ, I Just Wanted You to Fuck Me, And Then I Became Greedy, I Wanted You To Love Me."  from a Tracey Emin Installation

The exhibition, Tracey Emin: Love Is What You Want, opens today at the Hayward Gallery at the Southbank Centre in london and features painting, drawing, photography, textiles, video and sculpture, in works that are "by turns tough, romantic, desperate, angry, funny and full of longing." Seldom-seen early works and recent large-scale installations are shown together with a new series of outdoor sculptures created especially for the Hayward Gallery.

On view at the Hayward Gallery May 18 to August 29, 2011 - find tickets here.

tracey_emin_bed
tracey_emin_bed