Margot Bergman: Family Album @ Anton Kern Gallery in New York

For the artist’s second solo exhibition with Anton Kern Gallery, Margot Bergman presents Family Album, which includes her most recent paintings and photographs. Bergman has sustained an active painting practice in Chicago since the 1950s and honed a peerless style of figuration. For the last 15 years her subject matter has focused on individual faces of imagined people, predominantly women. Her style is characterized by active expressionistic brush work, unconcerned with symmetry, realistic proportions, and traditional notions of femininity. The artist can adeptly shift styles within a single composition, juxtaposing photorealistic eyes and lips, with a scribbly green hair-do, and a thin wash of color for the complexion. Accompanying Bergman’s paintings are theatrical and lively photographs that bear an uncanny resemblance to her painted works. Together Bergman’s paintings and photographs create a manufactured family album that memorializes the environment in which they were created and their palpable relationship with the artist.

Family Album is on view through August 16 at Anton Kern Gallery 16 East 55th Street New York, NY. photographs courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery

André Butzer @ Metro Pictures in New York

A exhibition of nine large, vibrant new paintings by artist André Butzer is now on view at Metro Pictures. Butzer’s latest paintings employ vivid color and his signature figures bringing to mind motifs and approaches that predate the stark abstraction and distinctive brushwork of his N-Bilder, begun in 2010. However, Butzer asserts that everything he does is unified by an exploration of color and that this new series is a natural continuation of his work. This exhibition continues Butzer’s longstanding investigation into the medium of painting, while pushing the limits of his oeuvre, and furthers the ideas explored throughout his career from art history to consumer culture.

André Butzer is on view through August 9 at Metro Pictures 519 West 24th Street New York, NY. photographs courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Diedrick Brackens Presents "Darling Divined" @ New Museum In New York

Diedrick Brackens constructs intricately woven textiles that speak to the complexities of black and queer identity in the United States. Interlacing diverse traditions, including West African weaving, European tapestries, and quilting from the American south, Brackens creates cosmographic abstractions and figurative narratives that lyrically merge lived experience, commemoration, and allegory. He uses both commercial dyes and unconventional colorants such as wine, tea, and bleach, and foregrounds the loaded symbolism of materials like cotton, with its links to the transatlantic slave trade.

Darling Divined is on view through September 15 at the New Museum 235 Bowery, New York. photographs courtesy of the gallery

Lubaina Himid: Work from Underneath @ The New Museum in New York

Turner Prize–winning British artist Lubaina Himid is debuting an entirely new body of work for her first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Himid has long championed marginalized histories as a pioneer of the British Black Arts Movement of the 1980s and ’90s. Her drawings, paintings, sculptures, and textile works critique the consequences of colonialism and question the invisibility of people of color in art and the media. While larger historical narratives are often the driving force behind her images and installations, the artist’s works beckon viewers to pay attention to the unmonumental details of daily life. Bright, graphic, and rich in color and symbolic referents, Himid’s images recall history paintings and eighteenth-century British satirical cartoons.

“Work from Underneath” is on view through October 6 at the New Museum 235 Bowery New York, NY. photographs courtesy of The New Museum

Oliver Beer: Vessel Orchestra @ The Met in New York

“Vessel Orchestra” is the first sound-based installation commissioned by The Met. The exhibition includes a musical instrument, a series of live performances, and an installation composed of thirty-two sculptures, utilitarian vessels, and decorative objects selected by Beer from the museum’s collection. Chosen for their natural pitches, which range from low C to high G on the chromatic musical scale, the vessels form an arresting and unexpectedly versatile instrument, comparable to an organ with multiple pipes. During museum hours, a pre-programmed audio interface will play a new composition written by Beer, activating the vessels to play in real time. On Friday evenings, the exhibition features a diverse group of guest artists who perform new compositions and improvisations on this radical musical instrument.

“Vessel Orchestra” is on view through August 11 at The Met Breuer 945 Madison Ave, New York, NY. photographs courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh, Loophole of Retreat @ the Guggenheim in New York

Over the course of her career, Simone Leigh (b. 1967, Chicago) has continuously and insistently centered the black female experience. In Loophole of Retreat, an exhibition presented on the occasion of Leigh winning the 2018 Hugo Boss Prize, she layers form, sound, and text to fashion narratives of resilience and resistance. The project’s title is drawn from the writings of Harriet Jacobs, a formerly enslaved abolitionist who in 1861 published an account of her struggle to achieve freedom, including the seven years she spent hiding from her master in a tiny crawl space beneath the rafters of her grandmother’s home. This act of defiant fortitude, which forged a “loophole of retreat” from an unjust reality, serves as a touchstone for Leigh’s long-standing commitment to honoring the agency of black women and their power to inhabit worlds of their own creation.

The Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh, Loophole of Retreat is on view through October 27 at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 1071 5th Ave, New York, NY 10128. photographs courtesy of the artist and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Alicja Kwade: ParaPivot @ The Met in New York

Using a wide range of media, Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade creates elegant, experiential sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical insight, she calls into question the systems designed to make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. Kwade has created ParaPivot I and II for The Met’s Roof Garden Commission, an annual site-specific installation by a living artist. These towering sculptures consist of powder-coated steel frames that intersect at oblique angles with massive spheres that float in apparent weightlessness in between. Although static, ParaPivot I and II are charged with the possibility of movement: their steel appendages, which fan outward around multiple axes, seem to trace the orbital pathways of the globes evoking an astrolabe or even a miniature solar system. Confronted with the artist’s abstract cosmos, our experience of scale, both human and galactic, is unsettled. Overall, Kwade seeks to recover the mystery and absurdity of the human condition, heightening our powers of self-awareness.

ParaPivot is on view through October 27 at The Met’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden 1000 5th Ave, New York, NY. photographs courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tandem: Alejandro Cesarco and Tamar Guimarães @ Alexander and Bonin in New York

The third iteration of Tandem, a project curated by Luiza Teixeira de Freitas is on view at Alexander and Bonin. Tandem consists of a series of five exhibitions presented over 2019 that run parallel to the gallery program, each one a dialogue between two distinct artistic practices. In the video gallery are two films by Tamar Guimarães, O Ensaio [The Rehearsal], 2018 and Canoas, 2010. The dialogue between the two works is framed by the changes that Brazil has gone through over the last decade – namely, the rise of new social movements, the reemergence of the political right, and the fragmentation of the left.

O Ensaio is on view from June 27 to July 25 and Canoas is on view at Alexander and Bonin 47 Walker St, New York, NY from July 26 to August 16 as part of Tandem: Alejandro Cesarco and Tamar Guimarães. photographs courtesy of Alexander and Bonin, New York

Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s @ the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York

Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s gathers paintings from the 1960s and early 1970s that inventively use bold, saturated, and even hallucinatory color to activate perception. Many artists during this era adopted acrylic paint—a newly available, plastic-based medium—and explored its expansive technical possibilities and wider range of hues. Color Field painters poured paint and stained unprimed canvas, dramatizing materiality and visual force of painting. At the same historical moment, an emerging generation of artists of color and women explored color’s capacity to ignite new questions about perception, specifically its relation to race, gender, and the coding of space. Spilling Over looks to the divergent ways color can be equally a formal problem and a political statement.

Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s is on view through August 18 at the Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort Street New York, NY. photographs courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art

bitforms gallery presents "IDEAL CONTAGION" in New York

IDEAL CONTAGION is curated by David Hunt, and features the work of Barry X Ball, Richard Dupont, Peter Gronquist, Jon Kessler, Ted Lawson, and Lynn Hersman Leeson. As a whole, the exhibition suggests a looming middle future where our current tsunami of data and information—largely blank, implacable and bewildering—is seamlessly internalized by each individual artist as the substrate of their work. Technology is transformed from a passing zeitgeist fetish into something inscribed on, or within, the artist’s own body, etched like algorithmic scrimshaw into the far recesses of his or her own mind. Each artist in the exhibition signifies a modernist categorical academic division, such as landscape, body art, or appropriation—that have yet to percolate and trickle down into traditional digital and techno-art discourse.

IDEAL CONTAGION is on view at bitforms gallery through August 16 at 131 Allen Street New York, NY. photographs courtesy of bitforms gallery, New York and Shark Senesak

ASHES/ASHES Presents L’IM_MAGE_N Group Exhibition In New York

L’IM_MAGE_N is a group exhibition curated by Timothy Hull, featuring Graham Anderson, Gina Beavers, Mathew Cerletty, Gregory Edwards, Anya Kielar, and Chason Matthams. The show’s title plays on the word image, folding it into different linguistic aspects yet allowing for the stability of decipherment. One could look at this through the rhetoric of the pop image, denoting a distillation or simplification into something symbolically new. While elements may be re-arranged, the image can still be read and understood—if not intellectually, then psychically. Although the image is passed through a sieve, its meaning contains vestiges of its origin. L’IM_MAGE_N is on view through August 4 at ASHES/ASHES 56 Eldridge Street New York, NY. photographs courtesy the artists and ASHES/ASHES, New York

Camp: Notes on Fashion @ The Met in New York

The Met Costume Institute’s spring 2019 exhibition, Camp: Notes on Fashion, explores the origins of camp’s exuberant aesthetic and how the sensibility evolved from the margins of society to become an important influence on mainstream culture. Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay, “Notes on ‘Camp’,” provides the framework for the exhibition by examining how fashion designers have used their métier to engage with camp in a myriad of compelling, humorous, and sometimes incongruous ways. The exhibition features approximately 250 objects, including womenswear and menswear, as well as sculptures, paintings, and drawings dating from the 17th century to the present.

Camp: Notes on Fashion is on view through September 8 at The Met Fifth Avenue 1000 Fifth Avenue New York, NY. photographs courtesy of The Met Costume Institute

Simone Fattal: Works and Days @ the New York MOMA

Simone Fattal: Works and Days brings together over 200 works created over the last 50 years, featuring abstract and figurative ceramic sculptures, paintings, watercolors, and collages that draw from a range of sources including ancient history, mythology, Sufi poetry, geopolitical conflicts, and landscape painting. Fattal’s work explores the impact of displacement, as well as the politics of archaeology and excavation, constructing a world that has emerged from history and memory. Both timeless and specific, Fattal’s work straddles the contemporary, the archaic, and the mythic.

Simone Fattal: Works and Days is on view through September 2 at MOMA 11 West 53 Street. photographs courtesy of MOMA

Jonas Wood @ Gagosian in New York

Jonas Wood combines art historical references with images of the objects, interiors, and people in his boldly colored graphics. In his new paintings and works on paper, Wood translates the three-dimensional world around him into pure color and line. The artist composes these works through a process of layering and collaging, using photography, projection, drawing, and then painting. Wood confounds expectations of scale and vantage point, causing the flat picture plane to bristle with an abstract charge.

Jonas Wood is on view through July 19 at Gagosian 555 West 24th Street, New York. photographs courtesy of Gagosian

Joan Mitchell: "I carry my landscapes around with me" @ David Zwirner New York

Joan Mitchell’s “I carry my landscapes around with me” is the first exhibition to focus on the artist’s multi-paneled paintings created across four decades. Mitchell established a singular approach to abstraction over the course of her career through her inventive interpretation of the traditional figure-ground relationship and synesthetic use of color. Her emotionally charged compositions evoke individuals, observations, places, and points in time. The horizontally oriented, panoramic expanse of Mitchell’s polyptych panels is ideally suited for landscapes—a poignant subject for the artist that she linked directly to memory. The exhibition features paintings from both public and private collections, as well as works drawn from the Joan Mitchell Foundation. “I carry my landscapes around with me” is on view through July 12 at David Zwirner 537 West 20th Street, New York. photographs courtesy of David Zwirner New York.

Strategic Vandalism: The Legacy of Asger Jorn’s Modification Paintings @ Petzel Gallery In New York

Situated in the context of the first thrift store paintings altered by Danish artist Asger Jorn, Strategic Vandalism: The Legacy of Asger Jorn’s Modifications Paintings is a group show of over 30 prominent international artists investigating multifarious appropriation methods spanning from the mid-1960s to the flourishing techniques of the 1980s, up to the present day. Strategic Vandalism: The Legacy of Asger Jorn’s Modification Paintings features works by Enrico Baj, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Vidya Gastaldon, Wade Guyton/Stephen Prina, Rachel Harrison, Ray Johnson, Jacqueline de Jong, Asger Jorn, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Per Kirkeby, Lee Krasner, Albert Oehlen, Francis Picabia, Stephen Prina, R.H. Quaytman, Arnulf Rainer, Julian Schnabel, Jim Shaw, Gedi Sibony, Alexis Smith, Daniel Spoerri, John Stezaker, Betty Tompkins, and David Wojnarowicz. Strategic Vandalism is on view through April 13 at Petzel Gallery 456 W 18th Street, New York. photographs by Adam Lehrer

HELEN FRANKENTHALER: SELECTED PAINTINGS @ Yares Art In New York

Helen Frankenthaler, New York City, 1974. Photograph by Alexander Liberman

Source: International Center for Photography

Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) is one of the most important and influential postwar painters, whose abstract compositions, featuring brilliant expanses of color and light, have inspired generations of artists and changed the course of art history. She led the way from Abstract Expressionism to a new and vital form of painterly lyricism that heralded the Color Field movement. On view in this exhibition are some twenty major large-scale paintings that celebrate the New York-born artist’s formidable, six-decade career. A classic Frankenthaler work, Swan Lake II (1961), filled with ethereal pools of electric blue, grays, and deep red, against a neutral ground, is a quintessential example of her unparalleled achievement. Helen: Frankenthaler: Selected Paintings will be on view through May 18 at Yares Art 745 5th Ave.

American Artist's "I’m Blue (If I Was █████ I Would Die)" @ Koenig & Clinton In New York

I’m Blue (If I Was █████ I Would Die) reconfigures the exhibition space into an imaginary seminar room for law enforcement personnel. Upon entering, visitors encounter what initially resembles a classroom with desks, black board, and an instructional video. In a nod towards the Blue Lives Matter countermovement that has developed in response to Black Lives Matter, American Artist has sculpturally reconfigured the first two elements. Fortified school desks barricade the video screen, while blue police fabric prevents those sitting in desks from seeing the film. The black board, outfitted with the same familiar blue cloth, only allows those reading from it to speculate on the prominence of blue. Onscreen, in place of an instructional video, visitors instead find a speaking digital character. Fabricated by Artist, the character’s speech interweaves imagined and quoted statements taken from two characters, one fictional, one real. I’m Blue (If I Was █████ I Would Die) is on view through April 13 at Koenig & Clinton 1329 Willoughby Ave. Images courtesy the artist, Koenig & Clinton, Brooklyn. Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York

Nadine Faraj Presents Get Used To Us @ Anna Zorina Gallery In New York

“Get Used To Us” echoes a historic LGBTQ rights slogan "We're here! We're queer! Get used to us!” Nadine Faraj’s fluid wet-on-wet technique abstracts erotic scenes to reflect an essence of sexual freedom that celebrates the mutability of gender and identity. The artist’s expressive application of pigment creates a blurring of boundaries between her subjects in a way that mirrors the suspension of self when provoked by passion. Get Used To Us will be on view through April 6 at Anna Zorina Gallery 532 West 24 Street, New York. photographs courtesy of Anna Zorina Gallery, New York City.

A Cat's Meow @ Shrine and Sargent's Daughters In New York

Independent curator Brooke Wise presents A Cat’s Meow, a group exhibition featuring work by Anja Salonen, Misha Kahn, Sam Crow, Thomas Barger and Ana Kraš. The exhibition explores the dichotomy of the interior versus the exterior, the domestic versus the wild, the archetype versus the atypical.

A Cat’s Meow will be on view until March 17, 2019 at Shrine and Sargent’s Daughters, 179 E Broadway, New York. images courtesy of Brooke Wise