Jonas Wood @ Gagosian in New York

Jonas Wood combines art historical references with images of the objects, interiors, and people in his boldly colored graphics. In his new paintings and works on paper, Wood translates the three-dimensional world around him into pure color and line. The artist composes these works through a process of layering and collaging, using photography, projection, drawing, and then painting. Wood confounds expectations of scale and vantage point, causing the flat picture plane to bristle with an abstract charge.

Jonas Wood is on view through July 19 at Gagosian 555 West 24th Street, New York. photographs courtesy of Gagosian

Hammer Projects Present: Max Hooper Schneider @ Hammer Museum In Los Angeles

Artists are often likened to inventors or scientists, and in the case of Max Hooper Schneider the comparison is more than metaphoric. Schneider’s background in landscape architecture and marine biology strongly informs his artwork. Research and scientific investigation are key to his process. He explores the relationships between philosophy and nature, the personal and the political, destruction and construction, and what he calls nonhuman and human agents. Blending his diverse areas of expertise, his idiosyncratic sculptures, installations, and drawings challenge conventional systems of classification, suggesting a worldview that strives to dislocate humans from their assumed position of centrality and superiority as knowers and actors in the world. Schneider created a new immersive installation for his Hammer Projects exhibition, his first solo museum show. The exhibition is on view through September 1 at the Hammer Museum 10899 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles. photographs courtesy of the gallery

Liz Larner Presents "As Below, So Above" @ Regen Projects In Los Angeles

Liz Larner’s As Below, So Above is a selection of new works that demonstrate her ongoing examination into sculpture, painting, drawing, and ceramics. The environment – the personal and the entrenched – are set together in these artworks that reach for an understanding of vulnerability through what is and has been considered low and directed, made capital of, and endangered. As Below, So Above will be on view through June 22 at Regen Projects 6750 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles. photographs courtesy of the gallery

The Museum Of Modern Art & MoMA PS1 Present First Major Retrospective Of Bruce Nauman In 25 Years

Co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel, Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts draws upon the rich holdings of both institutions and nearly 70 lenders. Encompassing Nauman’s full career and featuring a total of 165 works, the exhibition occupies the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the whole of MoMA PS1. This joint presentation provides an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and sculpture to neon, performance, film and video, and architecturally scaled environments.

Disappearing Acts traces strategies of withdrawal in Nauman’s art—both literal and figurative incidents of removal, deflection, and concealment. Close relatives of disappearance also appear in many forms. They are seen, for example, in holes the size of a body part, in the space under a chair, in the self vanishing around a corner, and in the mental blocks that empty creative possibility. “For Nauman,” said Halbreich, “disappearance is both a real phenomenon and a magnificently ample metaphor for grappling with the anxieties of both the creative process and of navigating the everyday world.”

Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts is on view through February 18 @ The Museum of Modern Art, and through February 25 @ MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City, New York. photographs courtesy of MoMA

Charles White: A Retrospective Opens @ MoMA In New York

Charles White: A Retrospective is the first major museum survey devoted to the artist in over 30 years. The exhibition charts White’s full career—from the 1930s through his premature death in 1979—with over 100 works, including drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, illustrated books, record covers and archival materials.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with groupings centered on the cities and creative communities in which White lived and worked. Each section is supported by relevant ephemera and supporting materials detailing White’s working process, political and social activities, and role as a teacher.

The exhibition includes representative work from the three artistic centers in which White lived, created, and taught throughout his life: Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles. It begins with early paintings and murals White made for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in Depression-era Chicago, where he grew up. Shortly thereafter, between 1942 and 1956, White lived mainly in New York City, teaching drawing, exhibiting at the progressive ACA Gallery on 57th Street, and supporting the Committee for the Negro in the Arts in Harlem. A selection of White’s personal photographs, also on view in the exhibition, capture his life in New York, while the inclusion of his work for album covers, publications, film, and television emphasize his dedication to more accessible distribution outlets for his art. The presentation concludes with the inventive output from his last decades as an internationally established figure and influential teacher in Los Angeles during the 1960s and ’70s.

The retrospective is on view through January 13, 2019 at MoMA 11 West 53 Street, Manhattan, New York. Following its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where it will be on view in Spring 2019. photographs courtesy of MoMA

Adrian Piper's 'Concepts and Intuitions, 1965-2016' Opens @ Hammer Museum in Los Angeles

Adrian Piper: Concepts and Intuitions, 1965-2016 is the most comprehensive West Coast exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (b. 1948, New York). It is also the first West Coast museum presentation of Piper’s works in more than a decade, and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist at the 56th Venice Biennale of 2015 and Germany’s Käthe Kollwitz Prize in 2018. Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, this expansive retrospective features more than 270 works gathered from public and private collections from around the world, and encompasses a wide range of mediums that Piper has explored for over 50 years: drawing, photography, works on paper, video, multimedia installations, performance, painting, sculpture, and sound. 

Piper’s groundbreaking, transformative work has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s, exerting an incalculable influence on artists working today. Her investigations into the political, social, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art frequently address gender, race, and xenophobia through incisive humor and wit, and draw on her long-standing involvement with philosophy and yoga.

For this exhibition, the Hammer is partnering with the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (ICA LA) to present Piper’s work What It’s Like, What It Is #3, a large-scale mixed-media installation addressing racial stereotypes. Adrian Piper: Concepts and Intuitions, 1965-2016 in on view through January 6 at Hammer Museum 10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles. photographs by Summer Bowie


David Lynch's I Was A Teenage Insect Opening @ Kayne Griffin Corcoran in Los Angeles

A group of new paintings, drawings, and watercolors are currently on view at Kayne Griffin Corcoran, and they’re not at all for the faint of heart. They touch on the dark dualities of our most sinister dreams and tickle us in that somewhat uninvited, but not exactly unappreciated sort of way. Within these works Lynch functions as an omnipresent narrator who candidly describes his representation of objects and figures in situations that are simultaneously commonplace yet unexpected. I Was A Teenage Insect is on view through November 3 at Kayne Griffin Corcoran 1201 South La Brea Avenue Los Angeles. photographs by Oliver Kupper

Dennis Koch Solo Exhibition @ Luis de Jesus in Los Angeles

Beyond the Funny Farm! Crypto-K, Cutouts, Cut-ups, Copies, Mirrors, Membranes, and Temporal Algorithms marks Dennis Koch's third solo exhibition with Luis de Jesus. In this exhibition, Koch creates a mind-map of relationships that find, build, and amplify meaning in the form of sculptures and drawings. Wooden newsstand-like sculptures display 100 vintage copies of LIFE magazine, each carved page by page to reveal interior images. Known as the first all-photographic American news magazine, LIFE revitalized itself during the 1960s in response to the popularity of television media. Koch's interest in LIFE as a cultural artifact stems from a time-parallel between contemporary political upheaval and the equally tumultuous events of the 1960s. The exhibition is on view through July 28 at Luis de Jesus 2685 S La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles. photographs by Summer Bowie

Marlene Dumas Presents "Myths & Morals" @ David Zwirner New York

Myths & Mortals is Marlene Dumas' first solo presentation in New York since 2010, features a selection of new paintings that range from monumental nude figures to intimately scaled portraits. Alongside these works, Dumas is debuting an expansive series of works on paper originally created for a recent Dutch translation by Hafid Bouazza of William Shakespeare’s narrative poem Venus and Adonis (1593). In these drawings—tender and erotic with hints of violence—the artist renders the story of Venus, the goddess of love, and her tragic passion for the handsome youth Adonis in her singularly expressive ink wash. Myths & Mortals is on view through June 30 at David Zwirner 537 West 20th Street New York. photographs by Adam Lehrer

Peter Shire's Solo-Exhibition “Drawings, Impossible Teapots, Furniture & Sculpture” @ Kayne Griffin Corcoran

Peter Shire, noted local sculptor and ceramicist known for his zany post-modern teapots and his connection to the 1980s Memphis Milano design movement is showing is new solo-exhibiton called “Drawings, Impossible Teapots, Furniture & Sculpture.” The exhibition is on view through May 12 at Kayne Griffin Corcoran, 1201 South La Brea Avenue, Los Angeles. photographs by Summer Bowie

Aurel Schmidt "I Rot Before I Ripen" @ P.P.O.W. Gallery in New York

In her most recent works, on view at New York's P.P.O.W. Gallery, Aurel Schmidt retires her attention to detail and color in a series of mixed media drawings and installation. Showcasing items belonging to past and present lovers in I Rot Before I Ripen, Schmidt investigates girlhood, streetwear iconography, brand significance, and heterosexuality. I Rot Before I Ripen will be on view until October 7 at P.P.O.W. Gallery 535 W 22nd St, New York, NY. photographs by Adam Lehrer