Tao Of Maceo: Read Our Interview Of Multi-Disciplinary Artist & Behavior Economist Maceo Paisley

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What does it mean to be a twenty-first century renaissance man? For Maceo Paisley, a wide range of disciplines comes together in a positive feedback loop that supports his indefatigable exploration of human behavior. Using embodied inquiry, he investigates his own identity and presents his findings in performance and film. A prolific writer of prose, he just released his first book Tao of Maceo, which takes inventory of his personal beliefs and aims to define his perspective more acutely. Stepping off the stage, he cultivates community through his Chinatown gallery, Nous Tous and a multi-pronged community practice/social innovation agency called Citizens of Culture. Click here to read more

"FOCUS: Agnes Martin" @ Lévy Gorvy In London

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FOCUS: Agnes Martin is an exhibition that places the artist’s sole completed film, Gabriel (1976), in conversation with an intimate selection of her abstract paintings. A screening room and adjoining gallery of paintings creates an immersive, meditative environment that highlights the relationship between Martin’s work and her conception of joy. “I thought my movie was going to be about happiness,” Martin commented on the production of the film, “but when I saw it finished, it turned out to be about joy–the same thing my paintings are about.” The exhibition will mark the second of the FOCUS series, which encourages sustained contemplation of landmark artworks by artists rooted in the gallery’s program, alongside related selections from their oeuvres. FOCUS: Agnes Martin will be on view through April 13 at Lévy Gorvy 22 Old Bond Street, London. photograph courtesy of the gallery

Une Journée Au Lac; A Fashion Editorial shot by Edoardo De Ruggiero

Stylist: James Valeri
Model: Mariam Eya (Supreme)
Casting: Alexandra Sandberg
Make Up: Karin Westerlund
Hair: Franco Argento
Stylist Assistant: Stacy Guetta
Photo Assistant: Talo Buccellati
Executive Producer: Benoit Dreyfus
On Set Production: Fabien Jallot and Pierre Goldberg

Read Our Interview of Cam Screenwriter Isa Mazzei & Star Madeline Brewer On The Occasion Of The Film's Premiere On Netflix

For anyone who has painstakingly worked to build and curate their Instagram page, only to have it disabled unexpectedly, you know just how devastating the loss can be. For those whose accounts have been hacked, the consequences can be much worse. Thus is the case for Alice (played by Madeline Brewer), a young and ambitious camgirl on the rise, who is relentlessly creating new shows and characters to improve her ranking on freegirls.live, a fictional camming site, designed and created specifically for the film. When Alice’s account is hacked and hijacked by someone with an uncanny resemblance, she is forced to outwit her doppelgänger while watching her own identity, both online and irl, degrade rapidly. Aside from the psychic thrill that the narrative provides, this film offers a refreshing subversion to the standard tropes that come from the sexy, horror genre. From the ways that sex work is represented in the film, to the ways that the screenwriter, Isa Mazzei and director, Daniel Goldhaber challenge the standard director-authorship, this film provides a wealth of new templates to consider that are seemingly radical, yet unsurprisingly, quite logical. In Mazzei and Goldhaber’s Cam, the hyper-indulgent and semi-private world of camming is given life in a way that is instantly translatable by the genre. A surreal, thrill ride that seeps into your unconscious mind and humanizes the very real people that hitherto have been unjustly stigmatized by the film and media industry at large.

Click here to read the full interview.

Cam is available to stream as of today on Netflix.

The Museum Of Modern Art & MoMA PS1 Present First Major Retrospective Of Bruce Nauman In 25 Years

Co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel, Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts draws upon the rich holdings of both institutions and nearly 70 lenders. Encompassing Nauman’s full career and featuring a total of 165 works, the exhibition occupies the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the whole of MoMA PS1. This joint presentation provides an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and sculpture to neon, performance, film and video, and architecturally scaled environments.

Disappearing Acts traces strategies of withdrawal in Nauman’s art—both literal and figurative incidents of removal, deflection, and concealment. Close relatives of disappearance also appear in many forms. They are seen, for example, in holes the size of a body part, in the space under a chair, in the self vanishing around a corner, and in the mental blocks that empty creative possibility. “For Nauman,” said Halbreich, “disappearance is both a real phenomenon and a magnificently ample metaphor for grappling with the anxieties of both the creative process and of navigating the everyday world.”

Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts is on view through February 18 @ The Museum of Modern Art, and through February 25 @ MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City, New York. photographs courtesy of MoMA

Charles White: A Retrospective Opens @ MoMA In New York

Charles White: A Retrospective is the first major museum survey devoted to the artist in over 30 years. The exhibition charts White’s full career—from the 1930s through his premature death in 1979—with over 100 works, including drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, illustrated books, record covers and archival materials.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with groupings centered on the cities and creative communities in which White lived and worked. Each section is supported by relevant ephemera and supporting materials detailing White’s working process, political and social activities, and role as a teacher.

The exhibition includes representative work from the three artistic centers in which White lived, created, and taught throughout his life: Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles. It begins with early paintings and murals White made for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in Depression-era Chicago, where he grew up. Shortly thereafter, between 1942 and 1956, White lived mainly in New York City, teaching drawing, exhibiting at the progressive ACA Gallery on 57th Street, and supporting the Committee for the Negro in the Arts in Harlem. A selection of White’s personal photographs, also on view in the exhibition, capture his life in New York, while the inclusion of his work for album covers, publications, film, and television emphasize his dedication to more accessible distribution outlets for his art. The presentation concludes with the inventive output from his last decades as an internationally established figure and influential teacher in Los Angeles during the 1960s and ’70s.

The retrospective is on view through January 13, 2019 at MoMA 11 West 53 Street, Manhattan, New York. Following its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where it will be on view in Spring 2019. photographs courtesy of MoMA

Opening Of Nino Cais' Don't turn off the light @ Fridman Gallery In New York

Don’t turn off the light is the second solo exhibition at Fridman Gallery for Brazilian artist, Nino Cais. It presents the artist’s take on male and female forms through installation, assemblages, and film. The artist utilizes his unique syntax, juxtaposing the banal and the fetishized, to create dreamlike unions of household objects and found photography. To read our 2014 interview of the artist, click here. Don’t turn off the light opens tonight @ 6pm and is on view through November 3 at Fridman Gallery 287 Spring Street New York. images courtesy of Nino Cais and Fridman Gallery

Leon Borensztein "It's So Fucking Lonely Here' @ Little Big Man Gallery

In his current show at Little Big Man Gallery, Oakland photographer Leon Borensztein presents a series of images that document life with his disabled daughter over 30 years. Sharon, Borensztein's daughter, is legally blind, prone to seizures, and diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia. By the time Sharon turned 15, her mother was unable to care for her due to drugs and alcohol, tasking Borensztein with raising their severely-disabled daughter by himself. The series investigates life with chronic illness from a familial perspective, as well as the harsh realities faced by disabled women today. It's So Fucking Lonely Here is on view at Little Big Man Gallery through August 25th. 1427 E 4th St #2, Los Angeles. photographs by Oliver Kupper

Preorder Autre's New Summer 2018 Issue

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Autre’s rainbow magic Summer 2018 Issue features a 23-page interview of the legendary Los Angeles-based Norwegian-born photographer Torbjørn Rødland who has three major solo exhibitions this summer. One in Los Angeles at David Kordansky gallery, one at Bergen Kunsthall in Norway and one at Fondazione Prada in Milan. The feature includes a double interview with Autre’s editor-in-chief Oliver Maxwell Kupper and one with Serpentine Gallery’s director Hans-Ulrich Obrist. This issue also includes over 40 pages of fashion editorials with LVMH prize finalist Eckhaus Latta and Maryam Nassir Zadeh. Autre also interviews actor Matthew Modine with rare photographs from the set of Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket, feminist surrealist Penny Slinger, Lisa Immordino Vreeland on the legacy of photographer Cecil Beaton with gorgeous self portraits, Duncan Hannah on living the high life in New York City, Marilyn Minter on her new show at Regen Projects, legendary German New Wave director Wim Wenders, and Herb Alpert. The summer edition also includes an excerpt from Françoise Hardy’s memoirs, interviews with Lauren Halsey about her community-based practice and Koak about the power of comics, and a special photo document from Pierre-Ange Carlotti. Preorder now – the first ten orders receive a previous issue of Autre of your choosing, for free (exempt are issues volume one issue three with John Baldessari and volume two issue one with David Hockney). Only 50 copies left of our Spring 2018 issue featuring Paul Thomas Anderson. 

 

Samantha Blake Launches "MAPS" @ Navel LA

On Saturday April 28th, Navel LA celebrated the launch of MAPS, Movement Art Performance Space. MAPS was founded by Samantha Blake and is dedicated to cultivating the contemporary and traditional arts of the Afro-Latinx and Caribbean diaspora in Los Angeles. The launch featured three dance performances by Samantha Blake, Chris Bordenave and Vera Passos (respectively), along with a film screening  by Nery Madrid, singing by Felicia ‘Onyi’ Richards, costumes by Gabrielle Datau + Jiro Maestu (Poche) and Desiree Klein, and still photographs by Russel Hamilton, shot during the film’s creation. You can read our interview of Chris Bordenave from our Winter 2017 issue hereNavel LA is located at 1611 S Hope Street Los Angeles. photographs by Lani Trock

Read Our Interview With Christian Coppola On The Value Of Short Cinema

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Christian Coppola is an LA-based filmmaker and photographer with a few short films already under his belt. Informed by an early fascination with The Wizard of Oz, Coppola’s personal style incorporates dreamy colors and the ever-present dichotomy between home and away. His short film debut, Heartbreak Hotel and his upcoming short, Daddy, explore the complicated nature of hotels, and the opportunities offered by the short film genre. Fixated on the process of creating his personal style, Coppola’s own viewing process is predicated on the question, “could anyone else have made this?” We had a chance to catch up with the burgeoning filmmaker and discuss his upcoming film, development as an artist, and his desire to create a universe through film. Click here to read more.

A Special Screening of Becky Johnston's 1979 Featurette Sleepless Nights With Maripol @ MoMA

New Cinema cofounder (and Hollywood screenwriter) Becky Johnston recently described her little-seen featurette Sleepless Nights as “an East Village reinvention of the Otto Preminger movie Laura” that plays “fast and loose with the noir detective genre.” The film was screened at MoMA along with a short discussion between Johnston and Maripol on the making of the film and it's lasting cultural almost 40 years later. photographs by Annabel Graham

Watch The Premiere Of "I Love Mexico City" A New Short Fashion Film From AllSaints

In the latest of its global creative initiatives, AllSaints has chosen to explore and celebrate Mexico City. The resulting short film, entitled ‘I México City’ champions the people and spirit of the city, focusing on the ways that local individuals use their personal style, identity and environment to put a unique stamp on AllSaints’ collections. Wil Beedle, AllSaints Creative Director: “Over seven days in March, we set ourselves the task of exploring Mexico City to find a diverse range of kindred spirits, who we feel express the values and attitude of AllSaints. Having photographed and filmed them in and around their own homes, streets and neighborhoods, we immediately shared the resulting imagery in a huge installation that became the backdrop for a local party we held in their honor. Just like the city itself, the week spent filming ‘I México City’ was chaotic and unpredictable, and more inspiring than most conventional ‘fashion-week’ experiences we’re ever likely to have.”

Watch "The Uncanny Valley" By Philippa Price for Stella McCartney's New Collection

Visual director Philippa Price has brought her vision of futuristic surrealism to music videos, music performances and installations globally. In the debut of the series, Philippa heads to the Clown Motel in the Nevada desert to inspire a wacky and wonderful slant on Stella McCartney's women’s and men’s collections.

Watch The Exclusive Premiere Of "Nonna: Paris" The First Chapter In A Film Collaboration Between Giu Giu And Hamadou Frédéric Baldé

Giuliana Leila Raggiani and Hamadou Frédéric Baldé, met in LA in March 2016, and immediately began a collaboration. This merge of their two creative worlds, manifested in the form of a film series, called “NONNA” (the name of giu giu’s reproduction of her grandmother’s original turtleneck). Hamadou’s perspective possesses an inspirational contrast; a balance of being unfiltered and honest, yet sensitive and dream-like at the same time, meshing effortlessly with giu giu. With little planning, they serendipitously traveled to the same places -- Paris, Morocco, Los Angeles, New York, and Tokyo -- and shot in each location. And after much evolution, the film has now become an expression of movement between a multitude of ages, races, and genders. In each city Hamadou and Giuliana traveled to, they encountered beautiful, real people. Each with their own story, and special "essence," in the way they view life. Each belonging to the limitless world Hamadou and Giuliana envision, where each human is interconnected and perceived equally. The Nonna turtleneck became the common thread woven through each chapter of the film. The turtleneck was used to show the body, through natural forms of movement (krump, ballet, contemporary/modern, running, walking, dunking, yoga, and even subtle movements, such as the movement of water, a blink of an eye, or lifting a finger). The turtleneck is timeless, recycling itself in this generation. Each city represents a different color from the original Nonna collection. What they anticipated to be a short fashion video, grew to be something deeper and unexpectedly more profound, and their collaboration took on a life of its own. The duo has been presenting the full 20-minute piece at exclusive screenings in the various cities featured in the film. Otherwise, it is launching online as a series, each chapter releasing individually, with the première of the first city, PARIS. Ultimately, the main intention of Hamadou & giu giu is to use “Nonna” as a catalyst in promoting a universal concept of love, during a time when it is needed most in the world.

Watch The Trailer For Actually Huizenga's Latest Film "Heavenly Sin"

All that glitters is not gold, but Actually Huizenga's latest film, Heavenly Sin, is one shimmery, heart-art beast. Culture roles and fairytales intertwine for an experience that is lush, queasy and magical. Welcome to a world of arranged marriages, robbed sexuality, strange decadence, polluted religion and what happens when the fable has gone to seed. Heavenly Sin is an otherworldly document boasting the wholly unique thumbprint of Actually Huizenga, one of the most striking artists to have emerged in the arthouse & pop-rock arena in a very long time.